Australian Bureau

posted in: News

That's right, in most countries, limited to only one – age man. What do we get to become a driver, and affect the safety of road users, you need a driver's license, to become a doctor, it is necessary to study medicine and take exams. But in order to elect the rulers of their own country and thus affect the fate of millions of its inhabitants, you do not need nothing, just live to the age of eighteen. You, of course, can I say, "Roman, you're mathematician. After all, it is clear that some percentage of the population understands the politics and voting, fully aware that he is doing. Well, rest, or do not participate in elections, or vote completely arbitrary. So that the average vote 'parsed' will offset each other, and the decision in the end, it will be taken by those who understand the issue.

"Alas, not so simple. Based on the article published 'Australian Bureau of Statistics' in 2005, in different countries from 5 to 20 percent of the electorate sufficiently versed in the political structure of the state and have at least some idea of the party platforms, running for Parliament in the election. In other words, 80% of the electorate voted by chance, without any real idea about the possible consequences of their actions. However, it would be not so terrible if their voices are uniformly distributed among the claimants. But the catch is that before the modern election candidates are doing everything possible to prevent this and just did not happen.

Judging from various sources, Bush has spent about 1.4 billion U.S. presidential race in 2004 Most of this money went to the PR-company current president. Judging from the same article 'Australian Bureau of Statistics', the best PR-campaign can change the preferences of voters who knew before the election, for whom he wants to vote, only one case out of thousands.

This entry was posted on April 23, 2018 at 5:56 am and is filed under News (Tags: ). You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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