Lone White Sail

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It created image becomes the object of attention of the reader, is of interest to the product and the emotional response in the reader. Poems of classical poets, who took a worthy place in the history of Russian literature, confirm this axiom. Rich and extremely interesting system of imagery in the poems of Pushkin, Lermontov, Blok, Gumilev, , Esenina, Tsvetaeva, Mandelstam, Pasternak! Let us remember their verses: "oro", "Lone White Sail" "Twelve", "Giraffe" and others. In it really in his poem "oro" Pushkin told us about the tree oro, or he meant something more? Of course, much more. But what would have happened if he had written about this "more" directly and ingenuously, calling a spade "a spade". Not trying to clothe your opinion, outlook and philosophy in a concise, vivid and memorable image, but "spreading the idea of the tree, a long and detailed explained to us, what a bad thing – a tradition of exploitation of man by man, and he strongly disagrees. Even a great style, even in rhyme – but it would not have been poetry.

And it would no longer Pushkin! Poetry – art image, art, parables and analogies. The art of silence about the main thing. The art of hiring. The highest achievement of the poet who writes poems about love – not to utter words of love, progovorennye to it millions of times, and did not come up with new ones, but silence about it – make it clear to the reader that he wrote about love, think about it, lives it and breathes. Strikes the reader is not the fact of recognition lyrical in feeling and passion, whom they had exposed, but the moment of self-awareness and understanding of these motives.

Do not need him to explain. It feels lyrical hero. Make him feel those feelings. And jump on speculation that the poet had in mind the same thing. Here's how to begin poetry. And not only in verse, and not even only in literature but also in every product of a different kind of art.

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